socialmediadesk

socialmediadesk:

Based on the feedback we received, we’re changing the Sandbox a little bit. Instead of lots of information crammed in every which way, every day you’ll receive three sections of news you can use:

In NPR & FRIENDS, we’ll highlight great ideas from across public media.

In THE WIDER WORLD,…

broadcastarchive-umd
broadcastarchive-umd:

We have in our collection one of the original NBC Chime boxes, made by the J.C. Deagan Company of Chicago, and used at NBC affiliate WRC-AM during 1920’s and 30’s. 
Three men at NBC were given the task to develop a station signal, to be used at 29:30 and 59:30 past the hour. They were: Earnest la Prada (an orchestra leader); Phillips Carlin (an NBC announcer) and Oscar Hanson (who later became an NBC vice president in charge of engineering). The three men originally experimented with a complicated seven-note arrangement using the notes: G-C-F-E-G-C-E in 1927 and 1928. 
Announcers in those pre-tape days actually had to strike the notes live on air! Not surprisingly, they found the seven-note sequence too complicated to remember correctly, so it was reduced; first to four: G-C-F-E, and then, on November 29th 1929 to three: G-E-C. 
In 1950, this famous three tone sequence became the first audio trademark in U.S. history. 
Part of the Inga Ruhnvold Kuhn Collection
Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture  |  Ask A Question

broadcastarchive-umd:

We have in our collection one of the original NBC Chime boxes, made by the J.C. Deagan Company of Chicago, and used at NBC affiliate WRC-AM during 1920’s and 30’s. 

Three men at NBC were given the task to develop a station signal, to be used at 29:30 and 59:30 past the hour. They were: Earnest la Prada (an orchestra leader); Phillips Carlin (an NBC announcer) and Oscar Hanson (who later became an NBC vice president in charge of engineering). The three men originally experimented with a complicated seven-note arrangement using the notes: G-C-F-E-G-C-E in 1927 and 1928. 

Announcers in those pre-tape days actually had to strike the notes live on air! Not surprisingly, they found the seven-note sequence too complicated to remember correctly, so it was reduced; first to four: G-C-F-E, and then, on November 29th 1929 to three: G-E-C. 

In 1950, this famous three tone sequence became the first audio trademark in U.S. history. 

Part of the Inga Ruhnvold Kuhn Collection

Special Collections in Mass Media and Culture  |  Ask A Question

todaysdocument

congressarchives:

225th Anniversary of the First Congress: We’ll be posting documents and stories highlighting the establishment of the new government under the Constitution through March 2016.

On September 9, 1789, the Senate passed a resolution that included all of the Senate revisions to the House proposed amendments to the U.S. Constitution. The resolution was made from this document, often referred to as the Senate Mark-up of the Bill of Rights. 

This document captures the process of the Senate’s debate over the the House passed amendments to the Constitution from August 25 until September 9. The printed text represents the work done in the House as it hammered out the proposed amendments from July to August. The handwritten annotations describe the work done in the Senate. The mark-up illustrates how the Senate sharpened the language of the amendments, eliminated some articles, and combined clauses to reduce the seventeen House amendments to twelve. 

On September 25, Congress passed 12 amendments that were sent to the states for approval. Ten of the amendments were ratified by the required three-fourths of the states and became part of the Constitution in 1791. These first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution are known as the Bill of Rights.

Senate Revisions to the House Proposed Amendments to the U.S. Constitution, 9/1789, Records of the U.S. Senate